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Head Quality inspection First Industry No. 1

Head First

$114

Head First

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Editorial Reviews

Product description

VERY RARE,OUT OF PRINT U.K. 2-CD BOX SET! ORIGINAL 'SNAPPER' LABEL, 20-PAGE BOOKLET amp; 21 SONGS. INCLUDES ORIGINAL SLIPCOVER. NEAR MINT CONDITION!!

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If Badfinger never quite shook off the mixed-blessings of its early Beatles associations, they at least carved out a comfortable niche for themselves in the early 1970s, largely by carrying on the sterling pop sense of their famous sponsors. Sadly, the Fab Four parallels wouldn't end there; Badfinger, too, ultimately fell victim to recriminations and rapacious record-biz dealings, but with more tragic results. Just months after finishing the December '74 sessions for this last album, band leader Pete Ham committed suicide (bandmate Tom Evans would follow suit eight years later) and its session tapes would eventually vanish into the mists of memory and mystery. Like many an unreleased project, Head First then became something of a lost legend. This double-disc set marks its first release, packaged with a second disc of album demos and outtakes. Though the album finally presented here is a sonically imperfect rough-mix tape, the band's fabled pop genius still shines through, especially on "Lay Me Down," "Keep Believing," and "Turn Around." Still, there's an inescapable sense of bitterness that bubbles to the surface, especially in Evans's rough-hewn "Hey Mr. Manager" and "Rock 'N' Roll Contract." Only drummer Mike Gibbins seems to shake it all off with the good-natured "Moonshine" and "Rockin' Machine." Fans of Ham's demo anthologies on Ryko will find a few more gems on the second disc, though even his normally upbeat demeanor is laced with frustration on "Smokin' Guns," "Nothing to Show," and "I Can't Believe In." A bittersweet epitaph to a great band--and a sobering lesson in the sordid business of pop music. -Jerry McCulley

Head First

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